Jack Jordan – Q&A

Today I’m pleased to welcome Jack Jordan to the blog. Jack is the author of Anything for Her, which he has just re-released and his new novel, My Girl will be published on 4 July 2016. Jack kindly agreed to answer a few of my questions.

1. Tell us a little about Anything for Her.

Louise Leighton’s life has fallen apart, all because of one fateful night. Her husband is an adulterer, her sister is his mistress, and soon, Louise will lose everything she owns. But she never imagined she would lose her daughter. 

Eighteen-year-old Brooke Leighton is missing. It’s up to Louise and the Metropolitan Police to find her. Has Brooke run away? Or has she been taken against her will? And can Louise aid the investigation without mentioning the night where all of her troubles began? 

If she mentions that night, she will incriminate her daughter for heinous crimes. But if she doesn’t, she may never find Brooke; and if she has been abducted, the person who took her may come for Louise, too. 

Sometimes the past comes back to haunt you. Sometimes the past comes back to kill you.

2. What inspired the book? 

The bond between a mother and her child is unbreakable, and the love is unconditional. Most mothers will tell you that they would do anything to protect their child. When writing Anything for Her, I wanted to explore just how far a mother would go to protect her child, and at what cost.

3. Are you a plan, plan, plan writer or do you sit down and see where the words take you? How long does the process take you from first line to completed novel?

I’m definitely a plan, plan, plan writer. When I first started writing, I let my stories lead the way, as I was exploring my abilities and allowing room for experimentation. Now that I’m a published author, I have to know where the story is going before I begin writing my next book. Knowing that my work will be scrutinised, I approach each book with as much detail as possible, so I don’t fall under the pressure. I like to plan each chapter beforehand, so when it comes to writing, I have the plan to follow. Chapters always change, but I really appreciate having the chapter timeline when I sit down to write the first draft.

4. Anything for Her was your first novel. What did you discover about the process of creating a novel that surprised you?

I was really surprised that my characters were able to evoke strong emotions in me. As the person who created them and the problems they found themselves in, I didn’t expect that they would make my heart race or tears well up. Sometimes I would leave my desk feeling drained. It’s a surreal experience. 

5. What do you do when you aren’t writing? What do you do to relax and get away from it all?

I must admit I’m not very good at relaxing. When I’m not writing, I’m reading or watching TV. The problem is, those two things inspire future projects, and the next thing I know, I’m back to writing and planning. It’s an unbreakable cycle!  

6. If you could only read one book for the rest of your life which book would it be?

Gone with the Wind. It shouldn’t be my all-time favourite book, as the oppression of African Americans and the martial rape scene featured in the story go against all of my beliefs, but still I find myself adoring this novel. The beautiful writing, the endless tragedies, and the unique ending have a reserved place in my heart. 

7. I like to end my Q&A’s with the same question so here we go. During all the Q&As and interviews you’ve done what question have you not been asked that you wish had been asked – and what’s the answer?

The question would be: what don’t you like about being an author? 

Taboo subject alert! The one thing I dislike about being an author is the criticism that comes with the trade. With this particular profession, it’s normal to receive criticism about one’s work, and as an author, you’re expected to take it without a word. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion, but some comments are difficult to forget. I think some people forget that, behind the book, there is a person who dedicated his or her life to it, and only wrote it to entertain. 

It’s like someone coming up to you during your workday and telling you what an awful job you’re doing. ‘Who even hired you? You’re the worst employee I’ve ever met. You should quit. I don’t even know how anyone could like you or what you do. I can’t believe I wasted my time and money on you.’ 

Of course this is a small con to many pros, and I want my readers to share their true opinions of my work, but sometimes I find that there is a lot of unnecessary venom in the words that, to me, doesn’t seem appropriate for someone who simply tried to entertain you.  

To end on a lighter note, I’ll mention what I think is the best thing about being a writer. 

There is nothing better than hearing how happy I’ve made someone by telling one of my stories. Learning that readers have stayed up until dawn while repeating ‘Just one more chapter’, sworn and gasped out loud, and laughed and cried, makes me tremendously happy, and lucky that I’m able to make a stranger’s day (and in doing so, they make mine!). 

Thanks very much for answering my questions and for appearing on my blog.

You’re very welcome! 🙂 x

About the book:

512pzL5FFaL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_

“Sometimes the past comes back to haunt you.

Louise Leighton’s life has fallen apart, all because of one fateful night. Her husband is an adulterer, her sister is his mistress, and soon, Louise will lose everything she owns. But she never imagined she would lose her daughter.

Eighteen-year-old Brooke Leighton is missing. It’s up to Louise and the Metropolitan Police to find her. Has Brooke run away? Or has she been taken against her will? And can Louise aid the investigation without mentioning the night where all of her troubles began?

If she mentions that night, she will incriminate her daughter for heinous crimes. But if she doesn’t, she may never find Brooke; and if she has been abducted, the person who took her may come for Louise, too.

Sometimes the past comes back to kill you.” (Image and synopsis from Amazon)

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. M. L. Kappa says:

    Very inspiring interview!

    Like

    1. janetemson says:

      I’m pleased to hear that, thanks 🙂

      Like

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