The Dog Who Dared to Dream by Sun-mi Hwang – review

Published by Abacus

Publication date – 7 July 2016

Source – review copy

isbn9780349142098-detail

“This is the story of a dog named Scraggly. Born an outsider because of her distinctive appearance, she spends most of her days in the sun-filled yard of her owner’s house. Scraggly has dreams and aspirations just like the rest of us. But each winter, dark clouds descend and Scraggly is faced with challenges that she must overcome. Through the clouds and even beyond the gates of her owner’s yard lies the possibility of friendship, motherhood and happiness – they are for the taking if Scraggly can just hold on to them, bring them home and build the life she so desperately desires.

The Dog Who Dared to Dream is a wise tale of the relationship between dog and man, as well as a celebration of a life lived with courage. Translated into English for the first time, it is a classic from Sun-mi Hwang, an international bestselling author.”

My thanks to the publisher for the surprise copy of this book. The following review details my thoughts on the book.

The Dog Who Dared to Dream tells the story of Scraggy, the odd one out of the litter of pups born to a mother who’s life has been series of pregnancies. Scraggly slowly sees her family disappear for various reasons until one day there is just her left. Alone she sets off to see the world outside the gates of her home. We follow her as she encounters other animals and humans, and grows up with her owner Grandpa Screecher.

The novel shows the trials of life through the eyes of Scraggly, grief at losing loved ones, the importance of friendship and the cruelties that can lay at the hands we trust the most.

This is a charming and moving tale about the relationship between man and dog. The symbiotic relationship and the often times cruel one that can exist. It is also a sad tale, one of the loneliness Scraggly faces as her family leave her.

It is a parable about the vagaries of life, of hardship, sacrifice and love. Scraggly’s children leave, some dying, others sold, never to return and she pines their loss equally. I was soon caught up with Scraggly’s tale, pulled along by the narrative, and oddly moved by it.

This is a short novel, only 160 pages in length but it packs a lot of story into those few pages. There is a fairytale like sense to the book, helped not only by the canine lead character but by the translation, which I always find tends to lend an aura of magic to a story. It opens on the door a little on a different culture, one perhaps unknown and therefore a little mysterious. Because it is such a short novel it is hard to discuss the book without giving too much of the storyline away and so my review will be one of brevity.

A lovely, perfectly paced story that will make you ponder.

 

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. tripfiction says:

    Lovely review. It is on our TBR pile…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. janetemson says:

      Thanks. It is a sweet, moving read. I do hope you like it 🙂

      Like

  2. kraftireader says:

    Aww this sounds lovely.

    Like

    1. janetemson says:

      It is a lovely read, short so can be read in a couple of hours 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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