Before the Blog review – Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

I thought it would be a good idea to put all of my reviews in one place. I’ve therefore created a Before the Blog review page where all of these reviews can be found. I will hopefully be able to say where it was first posted and when I read it.

Title –  Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

Publisher – Headline

Originally posted – Goodreads

Read – 10 – 13 August 2013

isbn9781472208194-detail

“The incredible novel from the author of Oscar-nominated THE SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK. For fans of THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME and THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER.

A powerful and important book for fans of Mark Haddon, THE SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK and Jay Asher.

How would you spend your birthday if you knew it would be your last?

Eighteen-year-old Leonard Peacock knows exactly what he’ll do. He’ll say goodbye.

Not to his mum – who he calls Linda because it annoys her – who’s moved out and left him to fend for himself. Nor to his former best friend, whose torments have driven him to consider committing the unthinkable. But to his four friends: a Humphrey-Bogart-obsessed neighbour, a teenage violin virtuoso, a pastor’s daughter and a teacher.

Most of the time, Leonard believes he’s weird and sad but these friends have made him think that maybe he’s not. He wants to thank them, and say goodbye.

In this riveting and heart-breaking book, acclaimed author Matthew Quick introduces Leonard Peacock, a hero as warm and endearing as he is troubled. And he shows how just a glimmer of hope can make the world of difference.”

I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Read giveaway.

It’s Leonard Peacock’s 18th birthday. It’s also the day he’s going to shoot his former best friend and then kill himself. Abandoned by his parents, Leonard wants to say goodbye to the four people he counts as his friends.

Though the reason why Leonard wants to kill himself is heart wrenching (I won’t mention it here so as to avoid spoilers), another layer to the sadness is the loneliness that Leonard feels. His friends are an elderly Bogart fan, a violin playing fellow student, a pastor’s daughter and his Holocaust teacher, none of whom he really knows.

He’s highly intelligent in some respects – recognising genuine works of art and being in advanced English for example but child-like in others. He says to himself if someone just wishes him happy birthday he’ll not kill his best friend and himself.

Despite the not so easy to read topic the boom itself is surprisingly easy to read. I found myself alternating between wanting to give Leonard a good shake and wanting to give him a hug.

Not my normal read but I’m glad I read it. A thoughtful and thought-provoking read. As Leonard may say Ubergood.

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Oh! Sounds like a good mix of heartwarming but discomforting read… well worth a read especially as I liked Silver Linings. Another for the wishlist😗

    Like

    1. janetemson says:

      It is a fine balance of both. I’ve not read Silver Linings Playbook (though I’ve seen the film). I’ll have to give it a try 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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