The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen 83 1/4 Years Old by Hendrik Groen, translated by Hester Velmans

Published by Penguin

Publication date 13 July 2017

Source – review copy

Translated by Hester Velmans

‘Another year and I still don’t like old people. Me? I am 83 years old.’

Hendrik Groen may be old, but he is far from dead and isn’t planning to be buried any time soon. Granted, his daily strolls are getting shorter because his legs are no longer willing and he had to visit his doctor more than he’d like. Technically speaking he is … elderly. But surely there is more to life at his age than weak tea and potted geraniums?

Hendrik sets out to write an exposé: a year in the life of his care home in Amsterdam, revealing all its ups and downs – not least his new endeavour the anarchic Old-But-Not Dead Club. And when Eefje moves in – the woman Hendrik has always longed for – he polishes his shoes (and his teeth), grooms what’s left of his hair and attempts to make something of the life he has left, with hilarious, tender and devastating consequences.

The indomitable Hendrik Groen – Holland’s unlikeliest hero – has become a cultural phenomenon in his native Netherlands and now he and his famously anonymous creator are conquering the globe. A major Dutch bestseller, The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen will not only delight older readers with its wit and relevance, but will charm and inspire those who have years to go before their own expiry date.

Read more on the Penguin website.

Hendrik Groen is embarking on his 84th year. In order to keep boredom at bay he decides to keep a diary of his days in the care home he in which he now resides. His diary charts the ups and downs of the coming year and how he fights the boredom that threats his days. Who says you have to grow old gracefully?

 

I have to admit I’m not really looking forward getting older with the potential for loneliness, misunderstanding and my body letting me down. I am, however, looking forward to being curmudgeonly and have been happily practising that for years. I liked the sound of Hendrik Groen’s diary and so thought it would be interesting to read about aging from someone in the know.

The diary format makes the book easy to read, the justification for at least finishing the month meant that I soon found myself well into Hendrik’s year.

The care home houses a host of wonderful characters. The Old But Not Dead Club members are a lovely bunch of people determined to enjoy their twilight years rather than waiting for the end by sitting in their chairs. I looked forward to hearing about the latest trip organised by a member of the club. Hendrik’s new found freedom with his motorised scooter was lovely to read as was seeing his burgeoning friendships develop.

It was interesting to read about the dynamics of the care home, that bullies will emerge whatever the age, that some were only too happy to live in the past, rather than face a potential bleak future and that some fight aging in whatever way they can.

There are also touchingly sad moments. The health scares of Hendrik’s friends, the sad prospect of Alzheimer’s, the risk of falls and the waiting of the inevitable casts a pall over the end stages of life. The book also highlights how easy it is to forget that the elderly were once young. They once fell in love or had their hearts broken, raised families or suffered loss. They danced and sang and were happy and vibrant. And all of their experiences shaped them, made them who they are and remain with them until the end.

The book discusses a wide range of topics in a humorous and often moving way. The political landscape of The Netherlands is discussed, as are the arrangements and funding for elder care, race and religious issues and the question of euthanasia. All of this is told with gentle humour and occasional, understandable rancour.

The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen is a funny, moving, thought-provoking and poignant portrait of aging and society’s view of the elderly.

About the author

Hendrik Groen started his diaries on the literary website of Torpedo magazine. He says about his work: ‘There’s not one sentence that’s a lie, but not every word is true.’ His first diary, the international bestseller The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83 1/4 Years Old has been translated into over thirty languages and is being adapted for television. His second diary went straight to number 1 in the Netherlands. He is currently working on a standalone novel

About the translator

Hester Velmans is the author of two popular children’s novels and a translator specializing in modern fiction. Her translation of Renate Dorrestein’s A Heart of Stone won the Vondel Prize for Translation and was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her translation of Lulu Wang’s The Lily Theater was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.

Her children’s book Isabel of the Whales now has a sibling: the second in the Whales Series, Jessaloup’s Song (age 10 and up).

This was book 9 in my #20BooksofSummer challenge.

 

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7 Comments Add yours

  1. MarinaSofia says:

    I too look forward to becoming curmudgeonly so this sounds like a perfect book to prepare.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. janetemson says:

      It’s quite poignant, a little happy, a little sad. Makes me determined to be a rebel in my twilight years 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Kath says:

    Having a bit of a soft spot for old men with twinkles in their eyes, I loved Hendrik but like you also saw it as commentary on society and how we deal with aging and how we care for the older generation. It’s made me much more mindful of that. But yes, I do intend to wear purple and be a lot Hendrik when I get to his age.

    Like

    1. janetemson says:

      Yes, I agree, it made me think more about how we treat the older generation too. And I think wearing purple and being like Hendrik is a great aim for the ‘twilight’ years 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This actually sounds like a really important book, giving a voice to.this experience. Congrats on getting to book 9 with 2 months still to go!

    Like

    1. janetemson says:

      Thanks!. It is important I think, but told in a non preachy, entertaining way.

      Like

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